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In the Year of Our Lord, 1066, Uther Pendragon, Duke of Normandy, sailed his army across the English Channel and defeated King Vortigern at the Battle of Hastings.  He moved quickly to consolidate his rule over the island, which lasted from A.D. 1066 until his death in A.D. 1215.  In that year, the boy Arthur, foster son of Sir Ector of the Castle of the Forest Sauvage, was revealed to be Uther’s son and heir by pulling the sword Excalibur from the stone.  Although he had the backing of Merlin, and the miracle to substantiate his claim to the throne, Arthur was immediately beset by rebellion, led by King Lot of Orkney.  With war brought the usual scavengers of civilization; monsters who seized the opportunity to pillage and wreak havoc on a defenseless people.  Arthur, guided by Merlin, re-established the national Adventurers’ Guild that his father had previously abolished.  A royal stipend was given to the Guild to train up new heroes to fight the darkness which had spread over the land.

 

 

HotFL 4 Roles Color (2)

 

HotFL 4 Roles Color (3)

 

HotFL 4 Roles Color2 (3)

 

HotFL 4 Roles Color2 (4)

Recycled Doodle

Six member party: Elf, Dwarf, Thief, Magic-User, Halfling, Cleric

Basic Adventuring Party w Color 1.2 (2)

Basic Adventuring Party w Color 1.2 (3)

 

 

Class Titles

Basic D&D includes “Level Titles” for each character class. Players are instructed to use these titles when interacting with each other and NPCs. For example, a third-level dwarf would introduce himself as “Thorin the Dwarven Swordmaster” instead of “Thorin the Level Three Fighter”.

Here are my updated level titles:

CLASS TITLES

Cleric:
Level 1: Deacon
Level 2: ArchDeacon
Level 3: Pastor
Level 4: Priest
Level 5: Elder
Level 6: Bishop
Level 7: Archbishop
Level 8: Cardinal
Level 9 (and after): Patriarch

Dwarf:

Level 1: Delver
Level 2: Dungeoneer
Level 3: Adventurer
Level 4: Minewarden
Level 5: Caveshield
Level 6: Axemaster
Level 7: Dwarf Squire
Level 8: Dwarf Knight
Level 9 (and after): Dwarf Lord
Elf:
Level 1: Mystic Swordsman
Level 2: Magician-at-Arms
Level 3: Leftenant of the Scrolls
Level 4: Captain of the Scrolls
Level 5: Battle Mage
Level 6: Warrior Mage
Level 7: Mage Squire
Level 8: Mage Knight
Level 9 – 10: Mage Lord

Fighter:

Level 1: Sergeant
Level 2: Master Sergeant
Level 3: Leftenant
Level 4: Captain
Level 5: Squire
Level 6: Knight
Level 7: Knight Captain
Level 8: Baronet
Level 9 (and after): Lord

Halfling:
Level 1: Yeoman
Level 2: Franklin
Level 3: Constable
Level 4: Bailiff
Level 5: Reeve
Level 6: Sheriff
Level 7: Gentleman
Level 8: Squire
Magic User:
Level 1: Wizard’s Apprentice
Level 2: Illusionist
Level 3: Enchanter
Level 4: Transmuter
Level 5: Invoker
Level 6: Conjurer
Level 7: Magician
Level 8: Wizard
Level 9 (and after): Archmage

Thief:
Level 1: Apprentice
Level 2: Pickpocket
Level 3: Footpad
Level 4: Burglar
Level 5: Robber
Level 6: Highwayman
Level 7: Thief
Level 8: Master Thief
Level 9 (and after): Prince of Thieves

In the original Basic Game, there are a few titles that do not make sense to me. The cleric, for example, has a list of Christian-derived titles (Vicar, Bishop, etc.), but right between “Bishop” and “Patriarch”, where “Archbishop” is the obvious fit, is the title “Lama”, which is a honorary title in Tibetan Buddhism.

Some of the titles I arranged differently, to try to represent more of a progression. For example, the magic-user would be able to master illusions before learning and mastering enchantments. Once the magic user masters enchanting objects and organisms, he learns to magically change them (transmutation), then begins to learn to magically summon energy forces (evocation), and then summon physical objects (conjuration).

In the Basic Game, Elves have dual titles, representing their ability to simultaneously fill the fighter and magic user roles. So, the elf’s first-level title is “Veteran Medium”, which is a combination of the Fighter’s “Veteran” title and the Magic-User’s “Medium” title. I thought up names that seemed more appropriate. Same with Dwarves and Halflings, who in  Basic D&D share the same titles as the Fighter.

Looking at the list, I’m thinking that it might be better to use the titles “Elf Squire, Elf Knight, and Elf Lord”; maybe just “Elf Lord”. The Halfling’s title of “Squire” might need to be “Halfling Squire” to avoid confusion with the Fighter’s title of the same name. The Halfling Squire I envision as more of the “country gentleman” than “knight’s apprentice”, which is a bit anachronistic, but, hey, it’s D&D.

Several other bloggers and contributors to role-playing fora have written their thoughts of the Mentzer Basic D&D Rulebooks. Here is one I found the past couple of days, and it’s very interesting.

First, the front-and-back of the character sheet:

B. Mentzer Character Sheet 1.1

 

Next, the game data reference sheet (from the Basic Player’s Manual):

A. Mentzer Basic PM Reference Sheets

D&D Cartoon

Someone made a comic based on the final script of the animated series (which was never produced). It’s only in Portuguese, though.

Becmi #3

Halleck and Aleena see a light ahead, and hear someone berating someone else who “sounds like a goblin”. Probably has an ugly, wrinkly, gray voice. Anyway, there’s a back and forth where the goblin swears that he has only seen Halleck and Aleena. Aleena whispers that she knows that guy’s voice, and that it is Bargle the Bandit. It turns out that Bargle is one of those “bad” magic-users. Aleena counsels that going back would be a mistake, because of the ghouls, and that fighting Bargle is the more prudent course, since he only has one goblin with him. She mentions that Bargle probably has the goblin ensorcelled. Bargle is described as a bearded man in a black robe. He casts a spell that makes himself invisible. Before he can make the goblin invisible, too, Halleck and Aleena charge into the room.

Halleck takes on the goblin, while Aleena says she will fight Bargle’s spells with her own. This indicates that she is at least level 3. Clerics in Basic do not get any spells at first level; they get one spell at second level, and two spells at third level.  Aleena already cast one spell, to cure Halleck’s wounds. Regardless, she is fated to die, and she does, after a quick and fierce battle. Bargle casts “Magic Missile”, which conjures a golden arrow that floats in the air. He points at Aleena, it hits her, and she falls down, dead. Halleck kills the goblin. At least, I’m pretty sure he does; there is a sentence saying that if your character’s hit points fall to zero, you won’t be going home. Every time you miss the goblin hits for two points of damage.

Aleena is dead, the goblin is dead, and Halleck is ready to usher Bargle into that same state, when Bargle casts a third spell (Invisibility, Magic Missile, and now Charm Person). The Saving throw is much higher–Halleck needs a 17 or greater to save. There are two endings, based on whether you make the save or not. If Halleck makes the save, he avoids getting magically tricked into being Bargle’s new friend, and he kills him dead, dead, dead (unless, of course, he misses, at which point Bargle screams and runs away). If Halleck fails the save, then he suddenly sees that Bargle is not such a bad guy, really. Bargle was actually helping Halleck and Aleena to fight the goblin, as it turns out. Halleck and Bargle make their escape from the dungeon, Bargle casts a fourth spell (Sleep) and Halleck wakes up some time later.

Whether he is charmed or not, Halleck carries Aleena’s dead body back to town, and delivers it to the church. If he made the Saving Throw against Bargle’s “Charming” spell, then Halleck gets a Potion of Growth, which will make him turn into a giant for a couple of hours. If he didn’t make the Saving Throw, then Halleck gets back to town too late, and the only potion that the church has left is a potion of healing. In either case, the church officials stress the potion’s value, and urge Halleck to save it for a future adventure.

The few paragraphs that follow discuss what the purpose of games are, and the unique nature of the Dungeons & Dragons game.